bm88
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:41 am
Location: UK

BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries..."

Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:47 am

New to the forum and found this on a well respected car news site:
Current i3 and i8 owners should know they won't be able to benefit from the improvements made in battery technology because Froehlich said it would be very hard to replace the batteries since these are integrated and bonded into the chassis.
From: http://www.worldcarfans.com/11503149051 ... t-be-based

Given with the LEAF it was made quite clear from the start batteries could be replaced easily, this is a distinct disadvantage for the i3 if true.

After trying a few EVs and accepting the limitations, I had been starting to look for a lightly used i3 but as I'd be keeping the car long term I do find this worrying.

Bunter
Posts: 372
Joined: Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:41 pm
Location: South Central England

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:21 am

bm88 wrote:New to the forum and found this on a well respected car news site:
Current i3 and i8 owners should know they won't be able to benefit from the improvements made in battery technology because Froehlich said it would be very hard to replace the batteries since these are integrated and bonded into the chassis.
From: http://www.worldcarfans.com/11503149051 ... t-be-based

Given with the LEAF it was made quite clear from the start batteries could be replaced easily, this is a distinct disadvantage for the i3 if true.

After trying a few EVs and accepting the limitations, I had been starting to look for a lightly used i3 but as I'd be keeping the car long term I do find this worrying.
That is contrary to the generally statements I've read here and elsewhere along the lines that all i dealers will be equipped with the necessary tools to replace the i3 batteries, for which labour costs are expected around €500. In other words it's a quick job. Since the battery is warrantied I'm surprised BMW are saying they are hard to replace.

Anyone know for sure the truth here?

Bill
Born Electric 15.03.14

mindmachine
Posts: 501
Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2014 2:08 pm
Location: Ohio, USA

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 10:43 am

Bunter wrote:
bm88 wrote:New to the forum and found this on a well respected car news site:
Current i3 and i8 owners should know they won't be able to benefit from the improvements made in battery technology because Froehlich said it would be very hard to replace the batteries since these are integrated and bonded into the chassis.
From: http://www.worldcarfans.com/11503149051 ... t-be-based

Given with the LEAF it was made quite clear from the start batteries could be replaced easily, this is a distinct disadvantage for the i3 if true.

After trying a few EVs and accepting the limitations, I had been starting to look for a lightly used i3 but as I'd be keeping the car long term I do find this worrying.
That is contrary to the generally statements I've read here and elsewhere along the lines that all i dealers will be equipped with the necessary tools to replace the i3 batteries, for which labour costs are expected around €500. In other words it's a quick job. Since the battery is warrantied I'm surprised BMW are saying they are hard to replace.

Anyone know for sure the truth here?

Bill
Bottom line as battery technology improves BMW wants to sell new cars with it rather then start retrofiting.

Schnort
Posts: 238
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2015 7:16 pm

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:12 am

Bunter wrote: i dealers will be equipped with the necessary tools to replace the i3 batteries, for which labour costs are expected around €500. In other words it's a quick job.
That much labor is 10 hours, or thereabouts.

Not really "quick", is it?

MikeS
Posts: 713
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2014 8:29 am
Location: Brighton UK

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 11:25 am

’10 hours’ in main dealer universe is about 3 in real life!
BMW 3 Series 2005 - Aug 2014
BMW Z4 35i 2009 - Mar 2014
BMW X1 Mar 14
BMW i3 Sep 14

janner
Posts: 235
Joined: Sun Jan 25, 2015 5:24 am
Location: Bath, UK

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 12:56 pm

Batteries are relatively easily replaced. See this:

http://www.greencarreports.com/news/109 ... neer-video

It's always a worry when someone new to the forum posts something like this. Hopefully you're interested in electric cars and not in sowing doubt about electric cars.
2015 i3 ReX Solar Orange, Loft interior world. BMW professional, 19" turbine-spoke 429 wheels, DC rapid charging, driving assistant plus.

bm88
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 9:41 am
Location: UK

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 1:04 pm

Hi Janner,

I'm completely not just trying to discredit electric cars.

As I said, I've experienced many of the EVs on sale, am very interested in the technology, accept the limitations and am narrowing in on purchasing one - quite likely a REX i3. I just saw the article and noticed it hadn't been posted here.

I know Nissan have clearly stated the price of a battery replacement and I wish BMW could commit to a firm 'all in' figure too rather than saying it is X hours labour.

I33t
Posts: 893
Joined: Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:01 pm
Location: Australia

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 1:52 pm

The i3's battery is modular and each module is designed to be replaced in case of premature degradation or failure.

Whether a better battery can or will become available in the future is unknown, but the existing battery must be able to be replaced if it can be maintained per module.
2014 BMW i3 BEV deposit placed 19th Dec 2013
Delivered in Melbourne 4/12/2014. Arrived locally 11/12/14, with 24km on the clock.

Edman951
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2013 7:30 am
Location: Montreal, Qc Canada

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 2:39 pm

People always talk about battery upgrade.
But its just like any other car and parts from models above it.
Take a 328 and a M3, upgrading the 328 to M3 is expensive, complicated.
Or upgrading EFI to direct injection from a new model. Almost not possible.
So why would it be any different with a EV?
Future tech is applied to new products, not for retrofit.

Like others said, companies want you to by the new one, not upgrade it. just like an iphone.
i3 Capparis White
Lodge interior, fully equipped,
DC-fast charging
Born Electric on 6/17/14

jadnashuanh
Posts: 4500
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 2:07 pm
Location: Nashua, NH USA

Re: BMW R&D Boss - "...very hard to replace the batteries...

Sun Mar 15, 2015 2:51 pm

Changing an individual battery in a module would not be feasible at a dealership, but replacing them by module, does not appear to be all that difficult. Now, assuming they do last a decent amount of time (some Prius batteries are still good from the first fielded ones), you may want the new tech from a new vehicle rather than just changing the batteries. This is akin to swapping a motor on a car...not inexpensive, but the costs may not justify the expense. Any conjecture on future battery capacity and whether it would be worthwhile swapping for the average person is just that, a guess. It's unknown at this point, how much of a core refund there may be, either...the battery pack is very likely to still be viable for some other functions, and will have a value. Just not sure how much.
Jim DeBruycker
2011 535i x-drive GT, 2014 i3 BEV

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