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MKH
Gold Member
Posts: 260
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:48 am
Location: Dallas

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Sat Feb 02, 2019 7:37 am

Wonder how many of these "drive-train malfunction" errors are equivalent to the Windows "blue-screen-of-death", caused by a software glitch code stumble that a re-boot/reset fixes?
Mark H.
2015 i3 Rex, Capparis White, Tera World, Technology & Driving Assistant, Parking Assistant, Harman Kardon Audio System, 19 inch 427 wheels, EVoInnovate EVSE

Beadbabe50
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:35 am

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:48 am

I just had my i3 towed, dead as a door nail until the guys tried to jump start it, but all the safeguards on the vehicle shut them out. So we are assuming it’s a battery thing. The lights flashed and clicked until it went totally dead and before this happened I had 50k on the car and used the REX 2 miles to get home. Shutting it off the motor still ran and I plugged in the charger. Today it had zero charge and was mostly dead. Unplugging it from the charger Nd closing the port door, that locked and would not open again. Couldn’t get it into neutral for towing Nd was forwArd facing in my garage, which then they had to drag it out on skates and onto a flatbed. Thankful I have triple AAA. but they tried for over an hour and a half to try anything to get it out of the garage. I will never front face in my garage again. I love this car , am hopeful, so will see what they say. It’s a 2015 Rex. And has almost every option you can get on it.

jadnashuanh
Posts: 4470
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 2:07 pm
Location: Nashua, NH USA

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:25 pm

If you try to charge the 12vdc battery without following proper procedures (that requires disconnecting the safety HV switch), you can damage things, maybe a lot.
Jim DeBruycker
2011 535i x-drive GT, 2014 i3 BEV

Star63
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:05 pm
Location: Finland

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Wed Mar 06, 2019 12:40 pm

i3StormTrooper wrote:Picked up my car tonight drove about 25 miles without issue.

Per the work order:

Error code 886.

Moisture in the range extender electrical machine. Performed vehicle test. Found fault stord for isolation resistance. Followed the test plan. Test plan checked isolation resistance and found OK. test plan indicated problem caused by moisture in the range extender electrical machine. Performed drying procedure by removing temperature sensor 6mm and running the engine for 3 hours. Before engine run, discharged vehicle battery with electrical consumers. Perform drying procedure. Reinstall temperature sensor. Torque bolts to 5NM and TECH 3 verifed this. Cleared fault memory and drove the vehicle. No faults or indicators returned. Charged the vehicle battery to full capacity.
Does anyone know where the 6mm temperature sensor is located? I'd like to try that procedure to see if it helps...
2014 BMW i3 REX

si2t3m
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2019 7:12 am

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:04 am

Just picked up my 'new to me' 2014 I3 Rex with 60k kms on it. Drove mainly on REX for a 900 trip back home and got the "Drivetrain malfunction". I do have BimmerLink and will check it later today and report back.

Regarding the dead 12V batt, I'm I over simplyfing it? I ordered and cigarette lighter plug with USB and voltage display. This should give me a clue?

alohart
Posts: 1665
Joined: Sat Nov 01, 2014 7:36 pm
Location: Honolulu, HI

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Thu Mar 07, 2019 4:14 pm

si2t3m wrote:Regarding the dead 12V batt, I'm I over simplyfing it? I ordered and cigarette lighter plug with USB and voltage display. This should give me a clue?
I've been driving with a 12 V voltmeter in the auxiliary power port under the climate control system controls for over a year hoping that it will detect a failing 12 V battery. However, the i3's 12 V system behaves so differently from any I am familiar with that I'm not so confident that this voltmeter will detect weak 12 V battery.

Because of the low capacity of the 12 V battery, the power required to boot several controllers when the doors are unlocked or opened or the hatch or frunk opened pulls the 12 V system voltage down as low as 11.9 V before the DC-DC converter boots which then begins charging the 12 V battery raising the 12 V system voltage to ~14.3 V.

When I first installed the voltmeter, I was concerned that this behavior indicated a weak 12 V battery, so I asked my BMW dealer to check the 12 V battery. His shop foreman told me in November, 2017, that this is normal i3 behavior and that my 12 V battery tested good. In March, 2019, the same 12 V battery continues working as it always has.

The DC-DC converter is very aggressive keeping the 12 V battery charged, so it's difficult to measure the battery's resting voltage. I finally connected a voltmeter to the 12 V terminals beneath the cargo floor by running the leads up through the underside of the car. This allowed me to monitor the 12 V battery without opening the hatch, doors, or frunk which would turn on the DC-DC converter. The resting voltage seemed to be within the normal range. However, I did not leave these leads attached to the 12 V terminals, so I can't easily check the 12 V battery's resting voltage whenever I want.
Aloha,
Art

2014 BMW i3 Arravani Grey, Giga World, Tech + Driving Assist, Parking Assist, DC Fast Charging, JuiceBox EVSE

greenlion
Posts: 9
Joined: Tue Feb 05, 2019 10:56 am

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Wed Mar 13, 2019 9:45 am

Well, count me in on the drivetrain malfunction error, powered up car this morning popped into D and boom, I had been reading up on things on here and read a post where someone simply physically moved the car a bit so i drove forward a few feet shut down entirely restarted and everything was good? car is a 17' rex

maclaytodd
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:07 am

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:17 am

HV Insulation Fault Fixed
I own a June 2014 build i3 Rex which I have had for over a year. Apart from the recall work, it’s been pretty trouble free and, most important, fun, practical and almost completely electric. It started pinging us with drivetrain error warnings about 5 weeks ago but these never resulted in drivability issues. I have the Bluedriver OBD scan tool which the mfr claims is not set up for the non-Rex i3’s. Accordingly, it doesn’t tell you much about the HV battery side. It did read fault codes indicating HV insulation issues (faults 22280F, 222814, 21F03E3, 21F0E4). I did not attempt to clear them. We just ignored them and kept using the car and, apart from our concerns about it possibly leaving us stranded, it worked fine. There was a very strong correlation with getting the faults on rainy days. On non-inclement days, even when there was a lot of dew on everything, the faults were much less frequent. More often, the faults gonged you shortly after the car was first put in drive. A couple of times, I saw them flash during Level 2 charging.
A couple of weeks into the problem, I took it to the dealer and, after considerable diagnostic and test work, they were able to figure it out. The very considerable amount of labor was due to having to remove parts such as the Rex intake manifold and panels in order to disconnect HV cables to each component at the source and install diagnostic connectors. My dealer appears to have used the standard BMW diagnostic tools so that leads me to believe that BMW dealers are well equipped to perform tests to measure insulation resistance. This sort of test generally requires a special test meter which subjects the test items to a high voltage and measures current leakage to determine resistance.
It turns out the problem was with the flow (cabin) heater and associated wiring which is up in front. Since the replacement part had to be ordered, they reassembled the car and we drove it while we waited. The existing heater was in use pretty much the whole time and did its thing without fail. I had been preconditioning to heat the car up prior to driving under the theory this might drive out moisture but this did not help to prevent the faults. The new flow heater took about three weeks to arrive from Germany (part number 64-12-9-893-003). It was on back order for a few days as it is a brand new part number. The HV cable running from aft forward was also replaced as signs of moisture were observed at the connector when it was disconnected to replace the flow heater. It was not indicated whether leakage came from inside or outside the heater. The area it is in appears to be pretty well shielded from spray and drainage from the windshield so I would be surprised if the leakage was external.
Thanks to a dedicated effort by the dealer tech, this problem appears fixed as I’ve had it back a week now and, rain, shine or in-between, no more faults. The flow heater will, by its nature, experience fairly large temperature swings and high temperature is hard on seals and insulation. This component could well be a prime suspect for HV insulation faults. In my case, disconnecting the HV cable at the heater and visually inspecting it might have avoided a lot of diagnostic work. Note: Working on HV should only be done by knowledgeable, well equipped persons as can be lethal. It remains a laborious task to replace the cable though.

Best regards & hope this helps.

bwilson4web
Posts: 696
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2016 11:59 pm
Location: Huntsville, AL

Re: How many have had the drive train malfunction error?

Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:19 pm

maclaytodd wrote:HV Insulation Fault Fixed
  • I own a June 2014 build i3 Rex which I have had for over a year. Apart from the recall work, it’s been pretty trouble free and, most important, fun, practical and almost completely electric. It started pinging us with drivetrain error warnings about 5 weeks ago but these never resulted in drivability issues.

    I have the Bluedriver OBD scan tool which the mfr claims is not set up for the non-Rex i3’s. Accordingly, it doesn’t tell you much about the HV battery side. It did read fault codes indicating HV insulation issues (faults 22280F, 222814, 21F03E3, 21F0E4). I did not attempt to clear them. We just ignored them and kept using the car and, apart from our concerns about it possibly leaving us stranded, it worked fine.

    There was a very strong correlation with getting the faults on rainy days. On non-inclement days, even when there was a lot of dew on everything, the faults were much less frequent. More often, the faults gonged you shortly after the car was first put in drive. A couple of times, I saw them flash during Level 2 charging.

    A couple of weeks into the problem, I took it to the dealer and, after considerable diagnostic and test work, they were able to figure it out. The very considerable amount of labor was due to having to remove parts such as the Rex intake manifold and panels in order to disconnect HV cables to each component at the source and install diagnostic connectors. My dealer appears to have used the standard BMW diagnostic tools so that leads me to believe that BMW dealers are well equipped to perform tests to measure insulation resistance. This sort of test generally requires a special test meter which subjects the test items to a high voltage and measures current leakage to determine resistance.

    It turns out the problem was with the flow (cabin) heater and associated wiring which is up in front. Since the replacement part had to be ordered, they reassembled the car and we drove it while we waited. The existing heater was in use pretty much the whole time and did its thing without fail. I had been preconditioning to heat the car up prior to driving under the theory this might drive out moisture but this did not help to prevent the faults.

    The new flow heater took about three weeks to arrive from Germany (part number 64-12-9-893-003). It was on back order for a few days as it is a brand new part number. The HV cable running from aft forward was also replaced as signs of moisture were observed at the connector when it was disconnected to replace the flow heater. It was not indicated whether leakage came from inside or outside the heater. The area it is in appears to be pretty well shielded from spray and drainage from the windshield so I would be surprised if the leakage was external.

    Thanks to a dedicated effort by the dealer tech, this problem appears fixed as I’ve had it back a week now and, rain, shine or in-between, no more faults. The flow heater will, by its nature, experience fairly large temperature swings and high temperature is hard on seals and insulation. This component could well be a prime suspect for HV insulation faults. In my case, disconnecting the HV cable at the heater and visually inspecting it might have avoided a lot of diagnostic work. Note: Working on HV should only be done by knowledgeable, well equipped persons as can be lethal. It remains a laborious task to replace the cable though.

    Best regards & hope this helps.
I had to put in paragraph breaks to understand your otherwise well written description.

Could you add some photos?

Thanks,
Bob Wilson
20k/27k mi 2014 BMW i3-REx
10k/10k mi 2017 Prius Prime

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