jadnashuanh
Posts: 4766
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 2:07 pm
Location: Nashua, NH USA

Re: Vehicle to grid charging

Mon Aug 12, 2019 6:15 pm

FWIW, some of the batteries in the original Prius cars are still viable and that chemistry is more prone to failures than the more modern stuff...IOW, the batteries should have a very long useful life, although, maybe not in a vehicle. My typical driving need is less than 30-miles, and with the weather we are having now, it is regularly reporting more than 80 being over 5-years old and plugged in each time I get home.
Jim DeBruycker
2011 535i x-drive GT, 2014 i3 BEV

i3Houston
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:30 pm

Re: Vehicle to grid charging

Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:40 am

Dont think the intent is to buy low sell high. I think technology would involve into something like Nest Thermostat, here in Houston, Nest can integrate with Center Point Energy and then raise the temperature during the Peak demand. Similarly, when Japan's energy grid can see cars hooked up in V2G mode, Energy companies can switch those home's power source from Grid to Vehicle, reducing the load on the Grid.

Assuming a single family home in Texas at Peak summer consumes 10-15KW per day, the usage during the peak hours would be ~5KW, which is a small percentage of ~18KW i3 battery.
TM3 Reservation holder/ 2015 i3 Rex

jadnashuanh
Posts: 4766
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 2:07 pm
Location: Nashua, NH USA

Re: Vehicle to grid charging

Tue Aug 13, 2019 2:02 pm

As I understand it, the main goal of V2G is to help balance the load on the grid so that it doesn't need expensive power plants to come on-line to fulfill that momentary need. As a result, the utility doesn't need to invest maybe hundreds of millions of dollars for a plant that may only need to be used infrequently. This keeps the costs down for everyone. To be fair to an owner, the power provided by their battery should be replenished the same rate both ways at a minimum, and ideally, receive a credit for being a supplier during the peak needs.

In areas where there's a lot of solar or wind, if a vehicle could be charged when that power is in excess, that would help, too while letting the rest of the grid suppliers from fossil fuels maintain their consistent output...think of the batteries as a buffer. Balancing the needs of the grid versus the needs of the user so that the vehicle had enough charge to do what is needed when needed is part of the complication.

Just was reading about a new technique of building LiOn batteries on silicon wafers...faster recharge rates, less degradation, at least double the energy storage per pound, and less expensive. First applications may show up next year, but they've been demonstrated in utility storage situations already. Current design maxes out at around 100Kw. Battery degradation will become a non-factor in the future...building the infrastructure to take advantage of it should be starting now.
Jim DeBruycker
2011 535i x-drive GT, 2014 i3 BEV

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