carlllefong1
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2021 9:56 am

Re: Question from Newbie

Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:15 pm

Thanks! I will get all of these apps.

frictioncircle
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2016 11:23 pm
Location: USA West Coast

Re: Question from Newbie

Sun Jan 10, 2021 1:44 am

Hello, carlllefong1 –

Regarding coding hold-state-of-charge on the CPO 2017 i3 REx that you're considering purchasing and your potential road trip...

Coding an i3 REx for maximum fuel tank size and hold-state-of-charge engagement level is definitely something you can do if you have a paid version of Bimmercode and a compatible OBD-II Bluetooth dongle. Check here to see the dongles Bimmercode supports: https://bimmercode.app/adapters/

I've been coding my i3 since 2014 and it's never been a two-minute process. The first time you connect your phone / tablet to the car using Bimmercode it will take 3-4 minutes just to read which ECUs (computer modules) are in your car.

Once you know which ECU you want to code (HU_ENTRYNAV should be the one for Hold-State-Of-Charge) Bimmercode will take about three minutes to read all the code-able options for that ECU.

Once you make a change to one of the variables it needs to be resaved in the ECU which takes another three minutes.

Just wanted to let you know that while it seems like making a coding change should be lightning quick, in reality changing just one parameter in a single ECU will take about 10 minutes.

frictioncircle
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2016 11:23 pm
Location: USA West Coast

Re: Question from Newbie

Sun Jan 10, 2021 1:59 am

One more thing...

The suggestion to get the PlugShare app is a very good one, PlugShare has some of the most accurate charging station info.

As you're new to EVs and planning on a long-distance drive to get your new ride home, have a Plan A and a Plan B for charging.

You may have a charging station in mind but what will you do if it's occupied when you arrive? Normally the driver will be in the car and ready to move off when her car is charged – but maybe she went into the mall for a few hours!

You may have a charging station in mind but it will be blocked by a gas / hybrid driver using the parking space (welcome to being ICEd!)

Finally, you may have a charging station in mind but it will be out of service when you pull up to charge (PlugShare is pretty accurate with station condition information in this situation).

Some station faults can be reset by calling the station's operator (ChargePoint, Blink, Greenlots, etc.) but do have an alternate charging solution in case your first choice is offline.

frictioncircle
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2016 11:23 pm
Location: USA West Coast

Re: Question from Newbie

Sun Jan 10, 2021 2:07 am

Finally, a well-written article with good REx information:

https://www.bmwblog.com/2016/06/01/bmw- ... lly-fault/

carlllefong1
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2021 9:56 am

Re: Question from Newbie

Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:53 am

Hey Friction, thanks for the link to the long-form article about REx function/limitations. In all of my research I had never heard about the Class Action lawsuit. The article is very well written, and is actually reassuring to someone who lives and will be driving in the Low Country of Georgia (flat as a pancake). I am curious as to whether anyone who has coded their i3 has been denied coverage for a warranty repair.

alohart
Posts: 2369
Joined: Sat Nov 01, 2014 7:36 pm
Location: Honolulu, HI

Re: Question from Newbie

Sun Jan 10, 2021 11:59 am

carlllefong1 wrote:
Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:53 am
I am curious as to whether anyone who has coded their i3 has been denied coverage for a warranty repair.
One member of this forum who used his early REx to earn money was denied warranty coverage when his REx engine suffered a catastrophic failure. He had coded HSOC, and his REx had been driven over 100k miles, so the REx engine had far more use than normal. A BMW dealer apparently told him that the REx system was not intended to be used as he had used it. He didn't appeal this decision despite many i3 owners urging him to do so. He had apparently bought another vehicle and merely parked his REx.

Coding HSOC merely implements the behavior of the REx system in most other markets around the world, so there's nothing about this change that should result in the voiding of one's warranty. Also, coding BMW vehicles has been occurring before the i3 was introduced, so it's nothing new. However, this doesn't mean that some dealers might try to deny warranty coverage.
Aloha,
Art

2014 BMW i3 Arravani Grey, Giga World, Tech + Driving Assist, Parking Assist, DC Fast Charging, JuiceBox EVSE

jadnashuanh
Posts: 5196
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 2:07 pm
Location: Nashua, NH USA

Re: Question from Newbie

Sun Jan 10, 2021 5:47 pm

Early on in the release of the i3, there was some discussion based on some BMW scuttlebutt that essentially said, the REx was added based on marketing people rather than because the engineers wanted it. Based on how the whole vehicle was conceived, when used as intended, there'd be no reason to add that extra 350# or so when they were sweating grams of weight to optimize efficiency. The marketing people felt that range anxiety was too big of a hurdle. Given that, it does add functionality, but keep in mind, it really is just a depowered moped engine, and they generally aren't designed for huge numbers of miles, either.

I haven't read the fine print on the warranty, but there may be a clause in there about commercial use.
Jim DeBruycker
2014 i3 BEV, 2021 X5 45e
(The i3 will be sold soon, <17K-miles, interested?)

frictioncircle
Posts: 144
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2016 11:23 pm
Location: USA West Coast

Re: Question from Newbie

Mon Jan 11, 2021 12:52 am

Hey Friction, thanks for the link to the long-form article about REx function/limitations. In all of my research I had never heard about the Class Action lawsuit. The article is very well written, and is actually reassuring to someone who lives and will be driving in the Low Country of Georgia (flat as a pancake). I am curious as to whether anyone who has coded their i3 has been denied coverage for a warranty repair.
That article was written by Tom Moloughney. He is an early i3 owner and enthusiast and has a very good relationship with BMW i. His information is reliable and he often had an inside line on developments within the i operation. If you come across other articles by him, they will definitely be accurate.

A quick, clarifying note about coding – it's something you can do the minute you get the keys for your i3 as long as you have the OBD-II dongle and the right software. I just wanted to let you know that you'll be sitting in the driver's seat wondering why it's taking so long to make a change to a single variable. Be patient... it works just fine but the process is so much slower than one might expect.

I've coded my 2014 BEV for the past five years and have never had the slightest pushback when making a warranty claim at a dealer.

BMW was ahead of the game with i in the mid-2010s – it's been so sad to see how they mismanaged their Act II.

The journey from having two unique interpretations of transport built from carbon fiber & aluminum in 2014 to (seriously?) a 3er hybrid in 2021 is nothing but a study in a great lead squandered.

edit: grammar, and added warranty details

eXodus
Posts: 136
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2020 6:06 am

Re: Question from Newbie

Mon Jan 11, 2021 4:37 am

jadnashuanh wrote:
Sun Jan 10, 2021 5:47 pm
Early on in the release of the i3, there was some discussion based on some BMW scuttlebutt that essentially said, the REx was added based on marketing people rather than because the engineers wanted it. Based on how the whole vehicle was conceived, when used as intended, there'd be no reason to add that extra 350# or so when they were sweating grams of weight to optimize efficiency. The marketing people felt that range anxiety was too big of a hurdle. Given that, it does add functionality, but keep in mind, it really is just a depowered moped engine, and they generally aren't designed for huge numbers of miles, either.
As far as I know the Rex was always part of the concept. Only the US-implementation due to laws is bad.
I worked with the Mini-E prototype back in 2010 in Munich. (Which had more range and power then the first i3)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mini_E

Here are some rumors I heard of Requirements BMW had back then for Project i

1. The old batteries should become storage for homes in second life
https://www.carscoops.com/2016/06/bmw-b ... from-used/
2. Range extender should be able to power a home
3. There was fierce competition within BMW for any new product line
4. When the executive saw the BMW Vision i concept cars he asked: "Can we build them exactly like that?"
https://www.automobilemag.com/news/bmw- ... s-reality/
5. There was a concept for an i1 and
6. The REX was envisioned as a the 1.5L the i8 got

User avatar
MKH
Gold Member
Posts: 808
Joined: Fri Nov 02, 2018 5:48 am
Location: Dallas

Re: Question from Newbie

Mon Jan 11, 2021 5:39 am

keep in mind, it really is just a depowered moped engine, and they generally aren't designed for huge numbers of miles, either.
Actually,the i3's range extender is based on BMW's C 650 scooter engine. This engine, in the scooter version is rated at 65 hp @ 7500 RPM. However, as the range extender, it is de-rated to 35 hp since all it is doing is spinning a generator to produce electricity. Many 650's on the road with 100,000 miles plus on them still going strong. People in the market for a used 650 are usually quite happy if they can find a 'low-mileage' one in good shape with only 50K to 60K miles on it. ("Scooter" in Europe is somewhat different than "Scooter" in the USA). In the EU the 650 is a common commuter and road-trip bike.

Scooter - Europe
scooter.jpg
scooter.jpg (8.52 KiB) Viewed 1488 times


Scooter - USA
Scooter 2.gif
Scooter 2.gif (167.82 KiB) Viewed 1479 times
Mark H.
2015 i3 Rex, Capparis White, Tera World, Technology & Driving Assistant, Parking Assistant, Harman Kardon Audio System, 19 inch 427 wheels, EVoInnovate EVSE

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